“It’s not greed that drives the world, but envy.”

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According to Torkel Nyberg in “Rossi vs. Snakes – A Superior man vs. Inferior People – An Athlete vs. Envy & Hate!

As Charlie Munger says about his long time colleague Warren Buffet in his famous Harvard speech.

Those of you who have raised siblings you know about envy, or tried to run a law firm or investment bank or even a faculty? I’ve heard Warren say a half a dozen times, “It’s not greed that drives the world, but envy.”

E-Cat IPO

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According to Torkel Nyberg in “Wow! Rossi is Planning a #LeonardoCorp #LENR #IPO?“, Andrea Rossi is probably planning a cold fusion IPO.

One theory about how his “E-Cat” works (nickel-catalyzed fusion of LiAlHfuel with energy released by beta decay of the resulting 8Be) is at http://hydrofusion.com/ecat-science/the-rossi-effect beginning

The Rossi Effect is based on a LENR process including Hydrogen and Lithium where Nickel is merely used as a catalyst and is not consumed in the process (some Nickel – Hydrogen reactions occur but the major part of the Nickel is not consumed and can be recycled). The Hydrogen – Lithium reaction is highly exothermic;

  1. Li7 + H1 → Be8 → 2He4 + 17.3 MeV,

where the 17.3 MeV (=2.8*10-12J) is released as heat.

Debunking “ego depletion”

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According to Daniel Engber

An influential psychological theory, borne out in hundreds of experiments, may have just been debunked. How can so many scientists have been so wrong?

and

In 2011, Baumeister and John Tierney of the New York Times published a science-cum-self-help book based around this research. Their best-seller, Willpower: Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength, advised readers on how the science of ego depletion could be put to use. A glass of lemonade that’s been sweetened with real sugar, they said, could help replenish someone’s inner store of self-control. And if willpower works like a muscle, then regular exercise could boost its strength. You could literally build character, Baumeister said in an interview with the Templeton Foundation, a religiously inclined science-funding organization that has given him about $1 million in grants. By that point, he told the Atlantic, the effects that he’d first begun to study in the late 1990s were established fact: “They’ve been replicated and extended in many different laboratories, so I am confident they are real,” he said.

But that story is about to change. A paper now in press, and due to publish next month in the journal Perspectives on Psychological Science, describes a massive effort to reproduce the main effect that underlies this work. Comprising more than 2,000 subjects tested at two-dozen different labs on several continents, the study found exactly nothing. A zero-effect for ego depletion: No sign that the human will works as it’s been described, or that these hundreds of studies amount to very much at all.

Carbon monoxide (CO) and earthquake prediction

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According to K. S. Jayaraman

Earth emits a burst of carbon monoxide (CO) a few days before an earthquake, according to geophysicist Ramesh Singh. […]   “The carbon monoxide shows enhancement in concentration a few days prior to the earthquake,” Singh said. […]

Singh said that CO levels were taken by an instrument onboard NASA’s Terra satellite — launched in 2009 — circling the earth in a polar orbit at a height of 705 km. The instrument measures CO concentrations at different heights and also computes the total amount of the gas in a vertical column of air above the earth surface.

Analysis of the satellite data showed a large peak in CO concentrations during January 19 and 20 — a week before the main earthquake event. On January 19, the total CO in the vertical column was also higher than usual. After the 26 January earthquake the concentration of the gas dropped.

 

“Falling down an elevator shaft and landing in a pool of mermaids”

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According to Scott Stossel, about Hunter S. Thompson

His accidental creation, while reporting on the Kentucky Derby in 1970, of the manic, first-person “Gonzo” writing style, as he responded to an impending deadline by ripping raw pages from his notebook and sending them to his editor.

According to Wikipedia

the genesis of the article has been described by Thompson as akin to “falling down an elevator shaft and landing in a pool of mermaids”

“Hand them a human in full bloom, and what they give back to you, after a few seasons, is a pressed flower.”

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According to Anthony Lane regarding rereading Portrait of a Lady by Henry James

What I browsed, back then, seemed a serene, rather aristocratic affair, strewn with bright, overtalkative folk who could switch countries at will; one bad marriage didn’t make it any the less romantic. What I discover now feels funnier, still sharp with the Jane Austen-like tartness of its predecessor, “Washington Square,” but it’s more than that. It’s a horror story.

The first critic to notice this, and to lend it adequate stress, was, of all people, Ezra Pound. In a brief essay from 1918, he wrote, “What I have not heard is any word of the major James, of the hater of tyranny; book after early book against oppression, against all the sordid petty personal crushing oppression, the domination of modern life.” In a footnote, he added, of James, “What he fights is ‘influence,’ the impinging of family pressure, the impinging of one personality upon another.” We think of Osmond, the supreme impinger, all the more cruel in his confinement of Isabel’s spirit because she gave herself to him, rather than to his rivals, in a defining flourish of her liberation. That, it turns out, is precisely what rouses his contempt. “One ought to make one’s life a work of art,” he tells Isabel, sounding like a warmup act for Oscar Wilde; any hint of aesthetic levity, however, vanishes after the marriage, once she realizes that he is an anti-Pygmalion, quenching her vital fire and nailing her into place like a statue. Osmond did not fall in love with our heroine; what he loved was “the idea of taking to himself a young lady who had qualified herself to figure in his collection of choice objects.” That is what monsters do, especially the polite and patient ones: they harvest souls. Hand them a human in full bloom, and what they give back to you, after a few seasons, is a pressed flower.